Home » History of Ceramics: Mexican Ceramics, Chinese Ceramics, Ceramic Art, History of Pottery in the Southern Levant, Mississippian Culture Pott by Source Wikipedia
History of Ceramics: Mexican Ceramics, Chinese Ceramics, Ceramic Art, History of Pottery in the Southern Levant, Mississippian Culture Pott Source Wikipedia

History of Ceramics: Mexican Ceramics, Chinese Ceramics, Ceramic Art, History of Pottery in the Southern Levant, Mississippian Culture Pott

Source Wikipedia

Published May 7th 2013
ISBN : 9781156700525
Paperback
126 pages
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 About the Book 

Please note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Pages: 125. Chapters: Ayla-Axum Amphoras, Barro negro pottery, Bauer Pottery, Beveled rim bowls, Caverswall China Co, Ceramics museum, Ceramics of indigenous peoples of the Americas, Ceramics of Jalisco, Ceramic art, Charles-Adrien Buenos collection, Chinese ceramics, Chinese influences on Islamic pottery, Fiesta (dinnerware), Franciscan Ceramics, Green glazed pottery of Atzompa, Hard-paste porcelain, Hispano-Moresque ware, History of pottery in Palestine, Hopewell pottery, Huaco (pottery), Mata Ortiz pottery, Maya ceramics, Meiping, Mexican ceramics, Miletus ware, Mintons, Ocotlan de Morelos, Pacific Clay, Roxanna Brown, Royal Doulton, Shelley Potteries, Soft-paste porcelain, Spode, Staffordshire Potteries, Stirrup jar, Stirrup spout vessel, Studio pottery, Tableware, Talavera (pottery), Talavera de la Reina, Thai ceramics, The Chadwick China Company, Tree of Life (craft), Vietnamese ceramics, Wedgwood, Yingge District, Yuchanyan Cave. Excerpt: Ceramics and pottery in Mexico date back thousands of years before the Pre-Columbian period, when ceramic arts and pottery crafts developed with the first advanced civilizations and cultures of Mesoamerica. With one exception, pre-Hispanic wares were not glazed, but rather burnished and painted with colored fine clay slips. The potters wheel was unknown as well- pieces were shaped by molding, coiling, and other methods. After the Spanish Invasion and Conquest, European techniques and designs were introduced, nearly wiping out the native traditions. Indigenous traditions survive in a few pottery items such as comals, and the addition of indigenous design elements into mostly European motifs. Today, ceramics are still produced from traditional items such as dishes, kitchen utensils to new items such as sculptures and folk art. Despite the fame of the prior, the bulk of ceramic items produced in the country are floor and wall tiles along with bathroom fixtures. Mexico has a number of well-known artisan ceramic traditions, most of which are in the center and south of the country. Examples are the Talavera of Puebla, the majolica of Guanajuato, the various wares of the Guadalajara area, and barro negro of Oaxaca. A more recent addition is the production of Mata Ortiz or Pakime wares in Chihuahua. While the number of artisans has been dropping due to competition from mass-produced items, the production of folk art and fine ware still has an important role in the Mexican economy and the production of pottery in general is still important to Mexican culture. Pre-Hispanic ceramic vessel on display at the Anahuacalli Museum in Mexico CityThe making of earthenware began to replace stone utensils in Mexico began around the Purron period (2300-1500 BCE). Many of these first ceramics were gourd or squash shaped, a carry over from when these vegetables were used to carry liquids. This earthenware developed into a pottery tradition that mostly used natural clay thinly coated with